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OIDC & Uses of OIDC in Angular application

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What is OpenID Connect, and what is the purpose of OpenID Connect?

OpenID Connect (OIDC) is an open authentication mechanism that adds an identity layer to OAuth 2.0. OIDC allows clients to verify an end user’s identity through authorization server authentication. By layering OIDC on top of OAuth 2.0, a single framework is created that promises to protect APIs, mobile native apps, and browser apps in a single, unified design.

What exactly is OAuth 2.0, and how does it work?

An authorization protocol called OAuth 2.0 is used to delegate user authentication to the service provider hosting the user account. It allows third-party apps to access the report. For online apps, desktop applications, and mobile devices, OAuth 2.0 enables authorization processes.

OAuth 2.0 isolates the client from the resource owner, or end-user, by establishing an authorization layer. Instead of utilizing the end user’s credentials to access protected resources, the client receives an access token when requesting access to resources owned by the end user and hosted by the resource server. The authorization server will give access tokens to the requesting client when the end-user has approved them.

OAuth 2.0 is deliberately intended to accommodate several client types that access REST APIs. This covers programs that communicate with the cloud via company web servers and applications on employee or customer mobile devices. The OAuth framework allows a range of client types by offering numerous procedures for receiving a token where the different mechanisms acknowledge the client type limits.

 

The use of OpenID Connect for authentication in Angular apps

It’s time for developers to stop messing around with user authentication. Consider using an identity provider when developing a new modern application. However, OpenID Connect (OIDC) is required to add a layer of complexity.

 

Secure implementation of angular oidc application is the focus of this presentation. For each circumstance, we examine the best flow to employ. Your application must adhere to the security properties of OpenID Connect. 

OAuth 2.0’s sole purpose is authorization, allowing one app to authorize access to another’s data and functionality. In addition to OAuth 2.0, OpenID Connect (OIDC) includes login and profile information about the logged-in user. For example, logging in to a system is known as authentication, and information about who has logged in is known as the user’s identity. Authorization servers that support OIDC are commonly called “identification providers,” as they return information about the Resource Owner to Clients.

One login may be used across numerous apps or “single sign-on,” with OpenID Connect (SSO). Social networking platforms like Facebook and Twitter, for example, might be integrated into an app to provide SSO so that users may use an existing login they are familiar with.

 

Comparing and Differing Between Standards

OAuth 2.0 is a framework for controlling access to a protected resource, such as an application or a group of files. In contrast, OpenID Connect and SAML are industry standards for federated authentication. The OAuth 2.0 standard is fundamentally different from the other two when it comes to the three criteria. It may be used concurrently with either OpenID Connect or OAuth 2.0. Enterprises may implement user authentication and single sign-on using OpenID Connect or OpenID Connect alone. Even though they both deal with logins, their advantages and disadvantages are vastly different.

For example, scopes and endpoint discovery are two areas that OAuth 2.0 leaves to the user’s discretion. In contrast, OpenID Connect employs an extra JSON Web Token (JWT), termed an ID token, to standardize these areas, which OAuth 2.0 leaves up to the user. Many consumer websites and mobile applications use this to allow users to log in.

 

A comparison between OpenID Connect vs. OAuth2.0

It’s not a matter of which structure an organization should utilize. Instead of when each of them should be implemented, keep in mind. Depending on the company’s type of activities to safeguard, a robust identity solution will employ one or more of these three frameworks. The following are some examples of when they could be helpful:

Authentication 2.0: If you’ve ever signed up for a new app and allowed it to access your Facebook or phone contacts automatically, you’ve undoubtedly utilized Authentication 2.0. This standard provides secure delegated access. Without the user needing to give their credentials, an application can perform operations or access resources from a server. The identity provider (IdP) can provide tokens to third-party apps with the user’s permission.

OpenID Connect: If you’ve used Google or Facebook to log in to an online shopping cart, you’re already familiar with this login option. To authenticate users, companies utilize OpenID Connect. IdPs employ this so users can log in to the IdP and then access other websites and apps without logging in or disclosing their sign-in details. 

 

Observes

OIDC Code Flow with PKCE authentication and authorization is currently working in the Angular application. Still, more security measures such as CSP, HSTS XSS prevention, and so on are needed. Angular apps that leverage APIs from any domain can benefit from this.

 

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